Other Voices, Other Rooms

This one-week, generative workshop will explore how, when, and why to incorporate external voices, sources, and ideas into your poetic projects. When might a poet utilize external material in order to cultivate a unique persona on the page? As a strategy of argumentation? As a method of association? As a means of refining style and voice? You will read and write every day, and you will come away from this workshop with both a batch of new poems and a concrete set of tools and considerations to take forward with you into future endeavors.

Biography

Natalie Shapero is the Professor of the Practice of Poetry at Tufts University and an editor at large of the Kenyon Review. Her poetry collections are Hard Child and No Object, and her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, The Nation, Granta, and elsewhere.

Natalie Shapero

Other Voices, Other Rooms

June 4 to June 8, 2018

Watercolor: Painting Light

Explore a range of strategies for painting with watercolor. Exercises will include mixing and layering washes, using a full value scale from light and dark, adjusting color, and working wet-in-wet. Students will also be encouraged to playfully explore the many surprises of watercolor as we build a working understanding of the medium. Class will work primarily from observation (still life, landscape and the model). Experienced students and those new to watercolor are welcome.

Biography

Joel Janowitz has exhibited widely, showing recently at Clark University in “Water + Color,” also at Concord Art Center, and at the Schoolhouse Gallery, Provincetown. His work has been collected by numerous museums including the Whitney Museum, the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Harvard University Museums, and The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. In 2016 Janowitz received his fourth Artist’s Fellowship in painting from the Massachusetts Cultural Council. In 2013 he was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship.

Joel Janowitz

Watercolor: Painting Light

Week 1: June 10 to June 15
Time: 9AM-Noon
Tuition: $600
Model Fee: $40
Discipline: Painting
Open to All
Registration Open
Registration Open: 10 places available
On-site Housing Full

In Praise of Brevity: A Multi-Genre Workshop

In the best short-shorts the writer seems to have miraculously figured out a way to stage, in a very compressed space, his or her own metaphysic: Life feels like this. Or at least: Some aspect of life feels like this. In this workshop, we will work to unveil the visions of life in a page and a half or less. We will strive to create an explosion on every page, in every paragraph. When writing very short compositions, the writer has nowhere to hide. Critique can thus be much more effective.

Biography

David Shields is the internationally bestselling author of twenty books, including Reality Hunger (named one of the best books of 2010 by thirty publications), The Thing About Life Is That One Day You’ll Be Dead (NYT bestseller), Black Planet (finalist for National Book Critics Circle Award), and Other People (Knopf, 2017). James Franco’s film of I Think You’re Totally Wrong was also released in 2017. Shields’s work has been translated into two dozen languages.

David Shields

In Praise of Brevity: A Multi-Genre Workshop

Week 1: June 10 to June 15
Time: 1-4pm
Tuition: $600
Open to All
Registration Open
Registration Open: 10 places available
On-site Housing Full

Writing Under the Influence: Creative Imitation

This will be a generative class. We’ll read four poets on Monday, and then each day thereafter students will bring to class a poem, in imitation. By the end of the week, I promise you you’ll have four of the best poems you’ve ever written and a set of skills you otherwise wouldn’t have.

Biography

Alan Shapiro has published twelve books of poetry, most recently Life Pig and Reel to Reel, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His Night of the Republic, was a finalist for both the International Griffith Prize and the National Book Award. 

Alan Shapiro

Writing Under the Influence: Creative Imitation

Week 1: June 10 to June 15
Time: 9am-1pm
Tuition: $725
Discipline: Poetry
Open to All
Registration Open
Registration Open: 10 places available
On-site Housing Full

The End: A Poetry Workshop

What is the end of a poem? What is its function? What makes one ending stronger than another? What do you do with a line you think "would make a good ending of a poem" that you have yet to write or perhaps even to conceive of? How does the end of a poem differ from the end of a collection? Can, even should, we consider them relational? When should you sacrifice sense or accretion in your poem for a randomly great ending? Do poems even really end? If so, why? This workshop concerns the effect and idea of the end of a poem as both protagonist and antagonist of your own writing.

Biography

Rowan Ricardo Phillips is the award-winning author of poetry collections The Ground and Heaven, as well as the collection of literary essays When Blackness Rhymes with Blackness. He has been the recipient of an Anisfield-Wolf Book Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Whiting Writers’ Award, the Pen/Osterweil Prize for Poetry and the GLCA New Writers Award. A Fellow of the New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU, Phillips has taught at Harvard, Columbia, NYU, Princeton, the MFA Program at Warren Wilson College and at Stony Brook University where he is a professor of English and director of the Poetry Center. 

Rowan Ricardo Phillips

The End: A Poetry Workshop

Week 1: June 10 to June 15
Time: 9AM-Noon
Tuition: $600
Discipline: Poetry
Open to All
Registration Open
Registration Open: 10 places available
On-site Housing Full

Such a Character! Writing Family

Who, reading Mary Karr’s memoirs, could fail to imagine her knife-wielding, smart-talking Texan mother? Who, reading Patricia Lockwood, can forget her father, the Rush Limbaugh-quoting, Arby’s-snarfing, farting priest? When we write memoir or autobiographical fiction, our characters are drawn from the people we love, the people we know best—those about whom we may have said our whole lives, “They’re such characters!” So why is it that sometimes those characters appear the blurriest in our drafts?

Biography

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich is the author of The Fact of a Body: A Murder and a Memoir, which was named a finalist for a Goodreads Choice Award and a New England Book Award, and one of Audible.com, Book Riot, and the Guardian’s Best Books of 2017. A National Endowment for the Arts fellow and two-time fellow at both MacDowell and Yaddo, she lives in Somerville, MA and teaches at Harvard.

 

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich

Such a Character! Writing Family

Week 1: June 10 to June 15
Time: 1-4pm
Tuition: $600
Discipline: Non-Fiction/Memoir
Open to All
Registration Open
Registration Open: 10 places available
On-site Housing Full

Elements of Style: A Fiction Workshop

While we are generally taught to think about the large-scale properties of stories—character, scene, description, plot—the most fundamental aspect of fiction, style, often gets short shrift. How do we decide how we want to tell our story and what language suits our purposes best? How do we discover and refine a natural sensibility and voice? This workshop attempts to isolate and hold up for examination those granular stylistic choices that make fiction hum.

Biography

Gregory Jackson is the author of Prodigals: Stories, a collection hailed by the New York Times as “so bold and perceptive that it delivers a contact high.” He was honored by the National Book Foundation as one of 2016’s “5 Under 35” and chosen by Granta magazine for its decennial list of Best Young American Novelists. His work has been published in The New YorkerGrantaVirginia Quarterly Review, and VICE. He is currently working on a novel, The Dimensions of a Cave (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), and teaching at Columbia University and Catapult.

Gregory Jackson

Elements of Style: A Fiction Workshop

Week 1: June 10 to June 15
Time: 1-4pm
Tuition: $600
Discipline: Fiction
Open to All
Registration Open
Registration Open: 10 places available
On-site Housing Full

Lovers, Liars, Monsters, Saints: You and the Persona Poem

Biography

Oliver de la Paz is the author of four collections of poetry: Names Above Houses, Furious Lullaby, Requiem for the Orchard, and Post Subject: A Fable. He also co-edited A Face to Meet the Faces: An Anthology of Contemporary Persona Poetry. A founding member, Oliver serves as the co-chair of the Kundiman advisory board. Additionally he serves on the Executive Board of Trustees for the Association of Writers & Writing Programs. His work has been published or is forthcoming in journals such as American Poetry Review, Tin House, The Southern Review, and Poetry. He teaches at the College of the Holy Cross and in the Low-Residency MFA Program at PLU. 

Oliver de la Paz

Lovers, Liars, Monsters, Saints: You and the Persona Poem

June 18 to July 13, 2018

We All Write Sentences: Summer

This one-week intensive invites both poets and prose writers to consider more closely the power of pushing out the boundaries of the English sentence. Reading, across genres, sentences by masters of the ecstatic--James Agee, Gwendolyn Brooks, Cormac McCarthy, Emily Dickinson, Ross Gay, Halldór Laxness, Melville, Toni Morrison, Nabokov, Gerald Stern, C.K.

Biography

Rebecca Gayle Howell is the author of Render /An Apocalypse and the translator of Amal al-Jubouri's verse memoir of the Iraq War, Hagar Before the Occupation/Hagar After the Occupation, both of which received wide acclaim. Among Howell's honors are fellowships from the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, the Carson McCullers Center, and the Kentucky Arts Council, as well as a Pushcart Prize; since 2014 she has edited poetry for the Oxford American. Her new book, American Purgatory, was selected by Don Share for The Sexton Prize and was released by London's Eyewear Publishing to both the U.K. and the U.S. in early 2017. Native to Kentucky, Howell is the James Still Writer in Residence at the Hindman Settlement School.
 

Rebecca Gayle Howell

We All Write Sentences: Summer

June 25 to June 29, 2018

Living the Dream

Just think of how many dreams you have during any given week or month! Think of the imaginative energy that pours into, and emanates from, those images and stories. Think too of how that imaginative energy might be harnessed or otherwise brought to bear on new poems and in your writing process in general. In our four-week workshop we will examine and discuss how one might employ the energies of dreams in our poems.

Biography

FRED MARCHANT’s most recent collection of poetry, Said Not Said was published by Graywolf Press in May 2017. He is also the author of four earlier books of poetry, and has edited Another World Instead, a selection of the early works of William Stafford, also from Graywolf. In addition, he has co-translated works by the contemporary Vietnamese poets, Tran Dang Khoa and Vo Que. He is a professor emeritus of English and Founding Director of the Poetry Center at Suffolk University in Boston.

Fred Marchant

Living the Dream

August 6 to August 31, 2018

Pages

Subscribe to FINE ARTS WORK CENTER in Provincetown RSS